Why smart leaders of change embrace technology for future success

Word Count: 1,072    Reading Time: 5.5 minutes

 

Successful leaders empower people and conservation through the smart use of technology

 

You need to use technology appropriate to your niche and size to be heard and be a successful leader of positive change, whatever your message.

Skilful choices and ways of living, symbiotic with nature and humans, are often drowned out by online noise.

Entertainment, news, frivolity, sensationalism and distraction win the most traffic and revenue.

Therefore, to connect to a wider audience and increase engagement, leaders of change must use technology in smart ways for future success.

 

A Startup 30 years in the making, supports leaders of change

 

We at Eco Freelance Support launched April 2019 to service genres like ecotourism, wellness, conservation, nature based education and evolving human consciousness.

Boosting their success and cementing their position, so as to make more positive change possible. Employing the best tactics and tools of big business to get good causes off the runway.

Founded on decades of experience in the fields we service, we provide IT, business and project management services to these genres.

Word Count: 1,072    Reading Time: 5.5 minutes


 

 

Empowering people and conservation through the smart use of technology

 

You need to use technology appropriate to your niche and size to be heard and be a successful leader of positive change, whatever your message.

Skilful choices and ways of living, symbiotic with nature and humans, are often drowned out by online noise.

Entertainment, news, frivolity, sensationalism and distraction win the most traffic and revenue.

Therefore, to connect to a wider audience and increase engagement, leaders of change must use technology in smart ways for future success.

 

A Startup 30 years in the making, supports leaders of change

 

We at Eco Freelance Support launched April 2019 to service genres like ecotourism, wellness, conservation, nature based education and evolving human consciousness.

Boosting their success and cementing their position, so as to make more positive change possible. Employing the best tactics and tools of big business to get good causes off the runway.

Founded on decades of experience in the fields we service, we provide IT, business and project management services to these genres.

Why did we startup?

 

Firstly, we found many of the folks in these genres struggled to succeed, despite working for the common good and being good at what they do.

Secondly, they often lacked the tools, technical skills and business experience to keep up with rapidly evolving technology and changes in business.

Thirdly, engaging the services that create a bigger audience is often too expensive, or overly complicated and time consuming for them to do it well.

Finally, they were losing too much time to these aspects because their expertise lies in different fields. Thus reducing their effectiveness and diluting their message.

 

Click to unlock the Complete Branding Checklist here.

So we started with a simple goal…

 

Provide an affordable service for those people to get off the runway and flying quickly.

Combining the best technology for their needs with sound business structure and workflows to boost their online and business performance.

Scalable to where they’re at, no matter their size, experience or vision.

Working with them to chart and support their success.

Making them more effective over the long term.

 

Click to unlock the Complete Branding Checklist here.

Real leaders of change

 

You don’t have to change the whole world, just yourself. You know the outer reflects the inner. Therefore, we need only change the inner landscape to change the outer world.

People who understand this are the real leaders of change. But they are not leaders of change because they actively try to change others.

Positive change leaders are such by way of example. They share with others ways of living that are more skilful.

More skilful is to be in balance with nature, with interpersonal relationships and the work-life balance.

Disconnection from nature and each other spreads separatism, dis-ease and stress.

 

Disconnection from each other

 

Despite being more connected than ever in the digital sense, the rise of depression, discontent and malaise demonstrate that our lives are not better for it.

Moreover our interpersonal relationships are more transactional than ever, often more about social proofs than anything else.

Specifically we mean common modern day proofs such as social media likes, shares and comments

 

 

Work-Life Balance

 

Are we using technology to make our lives better yet? Better meaning more skilful, as opposed to more convenient.

Being more connected online can mean less time connected in an organic interpersonal way.

Strangely, being online (or connected) means disconnecting from real people and nature in the here and now.

 

A laptop in the woods, smart leaders of change leverage technology for their success.

It’s a paradox

 

In modern society you must use technology to forward or promote any message.

If you are sharing more skilful ways to live, relate, build community, most likely you used technology to get the word out. I mean, what choice have you got?

Unless of course you are working at absolute grass roots level only, within your local community.

Leveraging technology correctly, drives more traffic to the source of your content, and it’s quality content that stands the test of time.

If it is not properly optimised for search engines, well you might as well go home! Non-optimised content goes nowhere, unless you get lucky and manage to go viral on something. That is statistically rare.

Consider the numbers

Seotribunal.com report these revealing statistics:

Google’s 90.46% share of the global search market equates to 63,000 searches per second.

That equates to 3.8 million searches per minute, 228 million searches per hour, and 5.6 billion searches per day.

For people to find you it is essential to rank well in search query results. Nailing your Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) is the only way to achieve this beyond the short term.

NeilPatel explains The 10 Most Important SEO Tips You Need to Know. Neil is a world renowned luminary on the subject.

 

A laptop in the woods, smart leaders of change leverage technology for their success.

How to swim in a big pond full of hungry fish

 

Those statistics above attest the online world is staggeringly massive and growing rapidly. It’s very easy to drown in all the noise, such as entertainment, news, frivolity, sensationalism and distraction.

Many important messages about positive change don’t get heard, or heard enough.

Typically it takes resources to compete with all the noisy online traffic.

A poor indictment of consumerist society, that entertainment, sensationalism and distraction get most of the traffic and make most of the money.

Consumerist bohemiths have the resources to drown out or out compete more skilful messages and choices in the market place and the social feed.

Therefore, a good degree of understanding and skill in using the technology to promote more skilful choices is required in the modern landscape.

The web has become very complex with massive user volumes.

It is now a very big pond with huge numbers of hungry fish in it, thus you need the most appropriate tools and familiarity with those tools to swim successfully in the big pond.

Or know somebody who does, like us.

 

Be a smart fish

 

In conclusion, the right tools used the right way are essential for you to continue to communicate your message and bring about positive change.

Furthermore, engaging pro support specifically geared to boosting leaders of positive change, no matter what scale or the stage of their mission they’re at.

Maintaining your work-life balance, interpersonal relationships and symbiotic relationship with nature.

Lest you start to drown in the online world, your example and message is lost and you fail to realise your vision.

The web is a tool, let’s keep it as such, and get back to reality…nature!

 

Resources

Robbie Richards.com: SEO Copywriting: 15 Killer Techniques (With Examples and A/B Test Results!) 

GDPR demystified for sole traders and small businesses: Part 1

Word Count: 2,456    Reading Time: 12 minutes

What is GDPR and does it apply to you?

The General Data Protection Regulation came into effect on May 25th 2018 and supersedes the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC and the UK Data Protection Act 1998. It applies to all persons and businesses that collect and process personal data within the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA).

Furthermore, it applies to data collectors and processors located outside the EU and EEA who do, or may handle personal data of EU citizens and data controllers. Therefore you could say that GDPR applies worldwide in the case of internet services and international trade.

The primary objectives of GDPR are to give control back to individuals of their personal data and to establish unified regulations within the EU for international trade, which in turn may lead to greater transparency in relation to personal data worldwide.

It is important to realise that GDPR does not only apply to data collected from websites, but also social media, email and other business processes such as paperwork, correspondence and accounts. It applies to all forms of personal data irrespective of what means of collection were used. While GDPR is obviously highly relevant to online data collection, its core principle is the protection of personal data in any format.

Many have expressed discontent with the regulations regarding them as an unnecessary layer of bureaucratic control over individual rights and trade. I understand this view but prefer the perspective that if all data collectors and processors worldwide adopted the key principles of GDPR, we would all benefit. This would lead more in the direction of a greater degree of data privacy we have not been afforded to date.

Word Count: 2,456    Reading Time: 12 minutes


 

What is GDPR and does it apply to you?

The General Data Protection Regulation came into effect on May 25th 2018 and supersedes the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC and the UK Data Protection Act 1998. It applies to all persons and businesses that collect and process personal data within the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA).

Furthermore, it applies to data collectors and processors located outside the EU and EEA who do, or may handle personal data of EU citizens and data controllers. Therefore you could say that GDPR applies worldwide in the case of internet services and international trade.

The primary objectives of GDPR are to give control back to individuals of their personal data and to establish unified regulations within the EU for international trade, which in turn may lead to greater transparency in relation to personal data worldwide.

It is important to realise that GDPR does not only apply to data collected from websites, but also social media, email and other business processes such as paperwork, correspondence and accounts. It applies to all forms of personal data irrespective of what means of collection were used. While GDPR is obviously highly relevant to online data collection, its core principle is the protection of personal data in any format.

Many have expressed discontent with the regulations regarding them as an unnecessary layer of bureaucratic control over individual rights and trade. I understand this view but prefer the perspective that if all data collectors and processors worldwide adopted the key principles of GDPR, we would all benefit. This would lead more in the direction of a greater degree of data privacy we have not been afforded to date.

What are the key principles of GDPR?

The most important principle is that individuals have complete control over their personal data and that their data is collected only with their explicit consent, rather than implied consent or without any consent. In addition, when collecting personal data it is essential to inform the individual who is collecting the data and for what purpose it is being used.

Simply put, you need an individual’s explicit consent to take any of their personal data and you must declare clearly who it is taking their data and for what purpose. This is at any point or step where you are requesting data, depending on your data processes and flow, you may need to gain explicit consent from the same individual more than once.

Explicit consent requires what the GDPR describes as a clear opt-in, not just an opt-out (especially as a default setting) or implied consent. If you are using pre-checked tick boxes or relying on someone pressing a send button without clearly explaining that data is being collected, for what purpose and by whom, then this is implied consent.

An opt-in is not the same as an opt-out, and is defined by GDPR as a mechanism provided for the individual to directly consent at each point of personal data collection, that is not pre-filled by default, and records their explicit opt-in consent for the data collection. Should it be requested by an individual or regulator, you must be able to demonstrate clearly the recording of the individual’s explicit consent to proceed with the data collection, at the time of collection.

Minimising personal data collection, storage and processing is another strong principle in GDPR. It requires us to evaluate how much personal data we do collect, what data is really necessary and how long data is required to provide our services and functionality to the individual. It is most important to know who we are sharing personal data with and if this is really necessary to provide services.

The aim should be to collect as little personal data as possible, only that which is essential to provide services, and collect no data at all, if possible. If you only need a first name or an email address to provide services, then take only that.

Article 25 of GDPR pertains to “data protection by design and by default”. Under GDPR organisations and businesses are strongly encouraged to design into their processes data privacy measures and safeguards from the very beginning. This is data protection by design.

Personal data should be processed with the highest level of privacy protection measures, by default. This means that only the minimum amount of data necessary should be collected and processed, with a short storage period and with limited accessibility. So that by default, personal data isn’t accessible to unauthorised data processors or any other third parties, without explicit consent of the individual. This is data protection by default.

What is Personal Data exactly?

As GDPR is all about protecting personal data, its important to understand what it is and that it includes data collected by automated and non-automated means. Unfortunately there is no definitive list of what is defined as personal data and what is not.

In reality, what constitutes personal data is subject to interpretation of the GDPR definition and how it applies in the context of the data collection, storage and processing.

Article 4(1) of GDPR defines “personal data” with clarification as follows:

‘Personal data’ means any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (‘data subject’); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, an online identifier or to one or more factors specific to the physical, physiological, genetic, mental, economic, cultural or social identity of that natural person.

Adding complexity to defining what is personal data, it is important to understand that each byte of data may or may not be an identifier in itself, but may become so when combined with other bytes of data relevant to the individual. Context and setting may affect the definition of any/and/or all bytes of personal data, not least when data is involved in behavioural analysis, profiling and data breach incidents.

The clever folks over at BoxCryptor (a Cloud services company) put together a good list of identifiers from everyday life to demonstrate the potential complexity and accuracy that can be achieved in identifying an individual. Please note that this list is not exhaustive and does not include digital identifiers such as IP addresses and cookie identifiers;

  • Biographical information including date of birth, marital status, social security numbers, criminal record, phone numbers, email addresses, residential address and bank information.
  • Looks, appearance and behaviour, including hair and eye colour, height, weight and defining characteristics.
  • Workplace data and information about education, including salary, tax information and student numbers.
  • Private and subjective data, including photos, religion and political opinions.
  • Health, sickness and genetics, including medical history, genetic data and information about sick leave and fitness data.

What are the Rights of Individuals under GDPR?

Under GDPR individuals are granted certain rights that may greatly affect your business and online processes, as listed below with brief explanations;

  • The right to be informed: Individuals have the right to be informed about the collection and use of their personal data. Inform individuals of your purposes for processing their personal data, retention periods for that data, and who you share the data with. This is ‘privacy information’ and is the key transparency requirement of the GDPR.
  • The right of access: Individuals have the right to access their personal data and must be able to do so verbally or in writing, on or off-line. Requests to access personal data must be actioned within one month maximum, it is however advisable to action in the shortest time possible.
  • The right to rectification: The individual’s right to have inaccurate or incomplete personal data corrected and made complete. This right is linked to the data controller’s obligations under the accuracy principle of the GDPR (Article (5)(1)(d)). An individual must be able to request rectification verbally or in writing, on or off-line and must be actioned within one month maximum.
  • The right to erasure: The individual’s right to have personal data erased, commonly known as the right to be forgotten. An individual must be able to request erasure verbally or in writing, on or off-line and must be actioned within one month maximum. This right applies in certain circumstances only and is therefore not absolute.
  • The right to restrict processing: The individual’s right to request the restriction or suppression of their personal data. If processing is restricted you have the right to store it, but not use the data. An individual must be able to request restriction or suppression verbally or in writing, on or off-line and must be actioned within one month maximum. This right links to the right to rectification (Article 16) and the right to object (Article 21).
  • The right to data portability: The individual’s right to obtain and reuse their personal data for their purposes across different services and platforms. The individual must be able to move, copy or transfer personal data from one IT environment to another in a secure manner, without affecting data usability. This right only applies to information an individual has provided to a data controller. This right must be actioned within one month maximum, however this is extendable according to the nature and complexity of the data requested. In addition, such requests may be rejected under certain circumstances. Additional reading on this right is thus highly recommended.
  • The right to object: The individual’s right to object to the processing of their personal data in certain circumstances, and including the absolute right to stop their personal data being processed for direct marketing, on or off-line. Individuals must be informed of their right to object. An individual must be able to make an objection verbally or in writing, on or off-line and must be actioned within one month maximum. There are circumstances where data processing may continue despite an objection, if it can be demonstrated there is a compelling and legally justifiable reason for doing so.
  • Rights in relation to automated decision making and profiling: As described by Article 22 of GDPR, provisions for rights in the cases of:
    • Automated individual decision-making (making a decision solely by automated means without any human involvement); and
    • Profiling (automated processing of personal data to evaluate certain things about an individual). Profiling can be part of an automated decision-making process.
  • The GDPR applies to all automated individual decision-making and profiling processes and procedures. Solely automated decision-making that has legal or similarly significant effects on individuals has additional rules to protect individuals rights. Such decision making processes can only be conducted where the decision is:
    • Necessary for the entry into or performance of a contract; or
    • Authorised by Union or Member state law applicable to the controller; or
    • Based on the individual’s explicit consent.
  • It is essential to determine if any data processing falls under Article 22 and if so, ensure that:
    • Individuals are given information about the processing;
    • Provide simple mechanisms for individuals to request human intervention in the data processing, challenge or appeal a decision;
    • Conduct regular assessments to ensure systems described above are working as designed.

Are you a Data Controller or Processor?

 

As this article is for sole traders and SMEs only, in all likelihood you are a data controller, in that in the course of your business and online activities you are collecting, at the very least, individuals’ names and email addresses. The person or organisation collecting such data is a data controller, as defined in Article 4 of the GDPR;

‘Controller’ means the natural or legal person, public authority, agency or other body which, alone or jointly with others, determines the purposes and means of the processing of personal data; where the purposes and means of such processing are determined by Union or Member State law, the controller or the specific criteria for its nomination may be provided for by Union or Member State law.

In most cases a sole trader or SME will be collecting data, the processing of such data is most likely handled by a third party service provider such as Google or Mailchimp for example. The GDPR introduces, for the first time, direct obligations for data processors to data subjects or individuals.

This is why big players like Google, Paypal and Mailchimp (examples only) have been working to achieve GDPR compliance. They are now subject to regulatory penalties and civil claims by individuals pertaining to data processing and protection. Article 4 describes data processors;

‘Processor’ means a natural or legal person, public authority, agency or other body which processes personal data on behalf of the controller.

What is a Data Protection Officer and do I need one?

If you are a sole trader or SME, depending on the type of business activities, in all likelihood you do not need to appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO). Most likely you need to designate a named data controller, possibly yourself. There are circumstances under which data processors and controllers must appoint a DPO, as described by Article 37(1):

(a) the processing is carried out by a public authority or body, except for courts acting in their judicial capacity;

(b) the core activities of the controller or the processor consist of processing operations which, by virtue of their nature, their scope and/or their purposes, require regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale; or

(c) the core activities of the controller or the processor consist of processing on a large scale of special categories of data pursuant to Article 9 and personal data relating to criminal convictions and offences referred to in Article 10.

As most people reading this article are unlikely to need to appoint a DPO we won’t go down that rabbit hole!

Okay, so you made it this far, well done…that concludes Part 1.

In Part 2 we will delve deeper into the actual things you need to do as a sole trader and SME to your website(s) and other data collection mechanisms such as social media, email and mailing lists. We will also discuss some of the technical difficulties in complying with the GDPR for small operators.

Why We Throttled Social Media?

Word Count: 943    Reading Time: 5 minutes

Why Throttle Social Media?

 

To save time, enhance productivity, limit distraction and attention fragmentation.

Furthermore, to eliminate social media related anxiety, preserve health, be more active and have a life!

We limit ourselves to the use of LinkedIn and Twitter for publishing articles and professional networking.

In addition investing some time in networking with bloggers in specifically relevant fields and we publish on our blog. But that’s it, that’s where we draw the line, for our own purposes.

However that’s not to say that we think all social media is a waste of time, no!

We do understand its value in networking, dissemination of information and of course marketing, depending on the nature of a service or product.

For instance in some of our project work it is an important component of developing a presence and positioning for a venue, service or product.

Word Count: 943    Reading Time: 5 minutes

 


 

Why Throttle Social Media?

 

To save time, enhance productivity, limit distraction and attention fragmentation.

Furthermore, to eliminate social media related anxiety, preserve health, be more active and have a life!

We limit ourselves to the use of LinkedIn and Twitter for publishing articles and professional networking.

In addition investing some time in networking with bloggers in specifically relevant fields and we publish on our blog. But that’s it, that’s where we draw the line, for our own purposes.

However that’s not to say that we think all social media is a waste of time, no!

We do understand its value in networking, dissemination of information and of course marketing, depending on the nature of a service or product.

For instance in some of our project work it is an important component of developing a presence and positioning for a venue, service or product.

Google and Social Media

 

Social media was considered to be an important component in SEO for search rankings.

However Google explained in 2016 it is difficult to accurately determine authorship identity of social media content, so did not (as of 2016) factor social media into search algorithms for ranking.

That said, social media does remain highly relevant though as a vehicle for driving qualified traffic to your sites and businesses, building and positioning a brand, and being an additional point of contact with potential customers.

 

Digital Marketing Value Versus Addictive Behaviour

 

It’s clear that social media platforms are valuable in the modern landscape.

We recommend and conduct integration with social media for our clients where appropriate.

Most importantly we aim to assist our clients to minimise their time and energy drains related to being online and IT in general.

Furthermore we are advocates of returning to nature for health, well being and sustenance. Most definitely including reducing time consuming social media.

Our issue is with overuse of social media as with any other addictive behaviour, it has detrimental effects, chronic and acute.

If you doubt the validity of claims about social media consumption as being potentially addictive, there are websites on the subject.

See It’s Time To Log Off, and 30 Signs Of Social Media Addiction for just a small sample.

In addition the rise of Digital Detox Retreats across the world in recent years for people wanting to “get unplugged”.

In fact we have supported digital detox type retreats in Ireland and Portugal, so far!

Finally there are numerous studies on the subject of social media use and depression and other negative effects.

Anya Zhukova provides a good introductory discussion of Negative Effects of Social Media over at Makeuseof.com.

See Resources at the bottom of this post for some related studies.

 

FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)

 

A typical argument against not being an individual consumer of Facebook and other hugely popular social platforms is the Fear Of Missing Out on something.

We travel a lot, we meet literally hundreds and hundreds of people in the course of a year.

We experience new real world stuff most of the time.

We certainly have plenty of adventures and probably travel more than most people.

We’re very open minded and well informed.

Furthermore, we lead rewarding lives and enjoy ourselves aplenty.

All achieved without a Facebook profile or any of the other popular platforms, save for those mentioned above we use for professional networking.

 

What We Gained Leaving Social Media

 

As the title of this article suggests, we did use popular social media when it first came out.

However we found quickly that we didn’t like it and the amount of time needed interfered with our lives.

Recognising the oscillation of background anxiety that came with its use and its design elements that were aimed at creating a kind of dependency akin to addiction.

We felt the effects of being mentally overstimulated and distracted away from the world outdoors, nature, fresh air, natural environments.

Our conclusion was that it is a form of entertainment that we don’t like.

We tired quickly of watching rooms of friends communicate with each other through their devices, and of conversations being interrupted by people’s need of a fix of their social media.

Not to mention the modern posture, head down, eyes transfixed as they finger scrolled through their online life.

What did we notice when we deleted our social media profiles, way back then?

 

We saved time, yep lots of time!

 

In addition we found that our background anxiety levels dropped away.

That is, after the initial period of discontinued use, which came with some passing feelings of anxiety and fear of missing out.

This left space and time to reconnect with oneself and develop that inner relationship more, without the need of any external validation of our activities, choices, preferences, opinions and lifestyle.

 

Sedentary Lifestyles Are Literally Killing Us

 

There is a fast growing body of research demonstrating how social media use may be a major contributing factor in the rise of anxiety and depression in children, adolescents and adults alike.

There are also physical impacts associated with the sedentary lifestyle and extensive use of screen interfaced technologies.

The human body did not evolve to sit for prolonged periods, it evolved to move, and move a lot!

Technology use sees many of us sitting for periods of time that are literally killing us!

It is estimated that 90% of premature deaths worldwide are attributable to this modern habit of sitting too much.

An overly sedentary lifestyle is shown to be connected to many chronic health conditions.

Check out Murat Dalkilinç’s TEDEx lesson “Why sitting is bad for you“ for a cool presentation on this matter.

 

Sitting Makes It Harder To Think

 

A sedentary lifestyle diminishes concentration also, by reducing blood and thus oxygen circulation to the brain.

Concentration is actually aided by movement which enhances circulation.

Too much sitting is a major factor in modern body posture related health issues such as spinal problems, circulation both blood and lymph, nervous system function and fat metabolising.

There are plenty of sources out there discussing the implications of sitting too much, here’s just a couple worth a look;

Why Sitting Down Destroys You | Roger Frampton – YouTube

Why Sitting Too Much Is Seriously Bad for Your Health – Authority Nutrition.com

We also notice a bunch of effects when we have to engage in prolonged use of screen interface technologies, such as;

• tiredness
• sore eyes
• anti social tendency and moodiness
• over stimulation
• anxiety
• compelled to repeat/prolong the experience of tech engagement
• reluctance to engage in outdoor activities
• less restful sleep
• diminished positive attitude

 

Other Purposes Behind Social Media

 

We feel it is also important to point out that social media is not a fundamental technology in and of itself, it uses technology to deliver a product that is essentially entertainment.

It is also a means of data mining private information of individuals and populations for selling on to marketers and promoters.

Social media companies employ attention engineers whose function is to make social media as addictive and compulsive as possible to maximise user engagement and optimise data acquisition and product/service promotion.

As with all things in life, social media use is ok in moderation, but give it some thought, do you really know why you spend the time and energy you do using it?

Give it some real deep thought, go inside your choices and behaviours, do you really know what motivates them?

Can this be extended to other aspects of our lives? You bet ya!

What could you be doing with your time if you didn’t spend as much time online?

Check out the work by Dr Cal Newport on this subject and others. Watch Cal’s TedTalk, Why You Should Quit Social Media.

Cal is a professor at Georgetown University.

In his latest book Deep Work, Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age.

 

Resources

Social media use and perceptions of physical health
Bridget Dibb, 2019

Investigating the Effects of Social Media Usage on Sleep Quality
Dinesh Kaimal, Ravi Teja Sajja, Farzan Sasangohar, 2017

Health Effects of Media on Children and Adolescents
Victor C. Strasburger, Amy B. Jordan, Ed Donnerstein, 2010